Forum programme

  • July 10
  • July 11
  • 09:00—10:00 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg
    10:00—10:20 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Forum organizers and participants, representatives of Russian ministries and departments, foreign delegations, and the heads of associations and unions as well as fishing and fish processing companies

    10:20—11:00 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Forum organizers, representatives of Russian ministries and departments, foreign delegations, and the heads of associations and unions as well as fishing and fish processing companies

    11:00—13:00 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Legend: Fishing is a unique type of economic activity and a special socioeconomic way of life. It functions within a complex multidimensional coordinate system where natural, economic, and social factors all come together.

    The fishing industry cannot be evaluated solely based on economic results or social indicators. This is why each country chooses its own method for allocating aquatic biological resources. The only common feature of each nation’s choice is the long-term stability of the selection it makes.

    Whether or not the proper choice is made should be evaluated by taking into account the population of aquatic biological resources, the socioeconomic health of coastal regions, the financial health of the fishing industry, and the fishing industry’s contribution to the development of related sectors of the economy.

    Discussion topics:

    – Economic efficiency and social stability: how can we find a balance between them?
    – Fishing regulation tools: what is a biologically permissible and economically viable fish catch?
    – To what extent is absolute competition possible in the natural resource sectors of the economy?
    – How fishing legislation was shaped: national examples;
    – The balance of national and private interests in the fishing industry.

    Organizers: Russian Research Institute of Fishery and Oceanography, Russian Association of Fishing Enterprises, Entrepreneurs, and Exporters, Russian Federal Agency for Fishery, Roscongress Foundation

    13:00—13:30 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg
    13:30—15:30 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Legend: Digitalization poses a serious challenge that will alter the value chain as many traditional sectors of the economy disappear, and we should be prepared for this.

    Large volumes of information (Big Data) have become available with the introduction of IT solutions and integrated platforms for data processing and interpretation. This significantly enhances the quality and speed of decision-making in an environment where the resource base is declining, a large number of remote sites need to be monitored and controlled, and the efficiency of fishing and processing is increasing. The connection of all the components of the production chain, all the way up to retail outlets, to the global data transmission network has created brand new opportunities.

    This truly comprehensive information will help take the industry to a new level of development and build business models with minimal risks.

    Discussion topics:

    1. Prospects for the development of fishing support information systems: digital ship logs, satellite monitoring data, etc.
    2. Effective detection and control of vessels engaged in IUU fishing
    3. Digital services for aquaculture: robot fish farmers?
    4. Digital technologies to improve product traceability
    5. Online services for consumers and small businesses
    6. Can the geolocation data of mobile operators be used to monitor amateur fishing?

    Organizers: Centre of Fishery Monitoring and Communications System (A. Vilkin), Russian Research Institute of Fishery and Oceanography, Russian Federal Agency for Fishery

    15:30—16:00 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg
    16:00—18:00 10/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Legend: The marine systems of the Arctic and Antarctica have a lot in common: high latitudes, significant seasonal fluctuations in light levels, extreme air and sea temperatures, and an abundance of sea ice. However, they are significantly different in other respects, and the cumulative impact of climate change on oceanographic processes and food chain dynamics is likely to alter the future of fishing there in completely different ways.

    It is essential to consider the various features (including geographical, physical, and biological) that define polar marine ecosystems as well as the known and projected effects of climate change on key zooplankton species and its impact on commercial species and existing fish resources in order to create future scenarios for fishing and managing fisheries.

    It is clear that the global community needs to come up with new approaches to utilizing the aquatic biological resources of the Arctic and Antarctica that take climate change into account.

    Discussion topics:

    1. From studying aquatic bioresources of the Northern and Southern Oceans to their comprehensive utilization
    2. Mutually beneficial international cooperation
    3. The impact of climate change on the distribution and composition of commercial types of aquatic bioresources
    4. Conservation of polar ecosystems

    Organizers: Russian Research Institute of Fishery and Oceanography, Russian Federal Agency for Fishery (V. Sokolov)

  • 09:00—10:00 11/07/2019 St. Petersburg
    10:00—12:00 11/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Organizers: Russian Association of Fishing Enterprises, Entrepreneurs, and Exporters, Russian Research Institute of Fishery and Oceanography, Russian Federal Agency for Fishery

    12:00—12:30 11/07/2019 St. Petersburg
    12:30—14:30 11/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Legend: Fisheries ensure direct and indirect employment for at least 120 million people worldwide.

    Fisheries are the foundation of urban planning for the country’s coastal areas. Fish processing requires the availability of the proper coastal production and social infrastructure, which helps solve problems involving people’s employment and welfare and is a powerful factor in the development of territories.

    However, fishing with a clear-cut seasonal nature, such as the salmon fishing season in the Far East, is often complicated by the lack of sufficient human resources, energy capacity, and transport infrastructure in the areas where fish are caught and processed. This makes it impossible to fully ensure the social and economic development of a region.

    In addition, there are small-scale fisheries and related activities everywhere as well as commercial aquaculture enterprises that provide for the vital needs of millions of people.

    Discussion topics:

    1. Are fish-based mono-cities capable of developing? How can permanent employment be ensured?
    2. New infrastructure solutions for fish processing: energy, construction, and transportation.
    3. Should remote regions use the rotation method or build full-fledged social infrastructure?

    Organizers: Russian Research Institute of Fishery and Oceanography, Russian Federal Agency for Fishery

    14:30—15:00 11/07/2019 St. Petersburg
    15:00—17:00 11/07/2019 St. Petersburg

    Legend:

    Shortcomings in the utilization of the ocean’s resources and the administration of law contribute to greater investment risks and constrain the growth of a sustainable ocean economy.

    Discussion topics:

    1. Optimization of the supply chain to reduce the price of fish products
    2. Buy, catch, grow – where can you get fish to eat in Russia?
    3. The impact of the economic situation on the consumption level of fish products

    Organizers: Russian Research Institute of Fishery and Oceanography, Russian Federal Agency for Fishery (Economy and Investment Department)