Forum programme

  • September 14
  • September 15
  • 11:00–12:30 Plenary session 14/09/2017 Lenexpo Hall 7.1

    Description:

    According to UN forecasts, the world population will increase from 7.4 to 8.5 billion people by 2030. A number of major countries lack a resource base. Sovereign rights to fish for bioresources within countries’ exclusive economic zones remain inviolable, including the regulated access of foreign vessels. Most of the water areas in the open part of the World Ocean are regulated by multilateral international agreements, but unregulated zones remain. At the same time, the United Nations is working to protect the ‘health of the ocean’ and create protected marine areas where industrial fishing is limited. How can we find a balance between the interests of multiple stakeholders? How thorough is the existing legal regulation and is it possible to conclude a new global deal on the sustainable development of the World Ocean’s bioresources? Leading world politicians, experts, and business executives will discuss the long-term prospects for the development of fisheries in the World Ocean and the associated risks.

    Structure

    • View of the UN FAO on the effectiveness of existing international conventions for the conservation and development of bioresources.
    • Key challenges for international organizations responsible for implementing the existing multilateral conventions on the conservation and development of bioresources (for example, CCAMLR / ICCAT / NEAFC).
    • Ensuring national interests when obtaining access to fishing in areas covered by international agreements and in the exclusive economic zones of foreign states (positions of the EU, China, Norway, Chile/Peru, Russia, and African countries).
    • Current UN policy on the establishment of protected water areas: criteria for selecting areas, risk zones, the balance of economic interests, and nature conservation.
    • The voice of business: how much do politics contribute to the economic efficiency of fishing in remote areas and what needs to be changed?

    Outcome

    • Documenting the positions of key stakeholders.
    • Useful lessons for drafting agreements for unregulated areas or modifying existing conventions.

    Possible decision to hold an international conference under the auspices of the UN FAO to develop and coordinate universal rules and conditions based on objective criteria for countries to access the open areas of the World Ocean.

    Participants:

    1. Ilya Shestakov, Deputy Minister of Agriculture of the Russian Federation; Director, Federal Agency for Fishery
    2. Per Sandberg, Minister of Fisheries of the Kingdom of Norway
    3. Aziz Akhannouch, Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries of Morocco;
    4. Pablo Berazaluce Maturana, Undersecretary of Fisheries and Aquaculture of the Republic of Chile;
    5. Toshiro Shirasu, President, Japan Fisheries Association;
    6. Abdellah Srour, Executive Secretary, General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean and Black Sea, UN Food and Agriculture Organization;
    7. Huang Baoshan, Vice President and Secretary General, China Overseas Fisheries Association;
    8. Sergey Sidorsky, Minister in Charge of Industry and the Agro-Industrial Complex, Eurasian Economic Commission.

    Moderator: Andrew Mallison, Director General, International Fishmeal and Fish Oil Organization (IFFO).

    13:30–14:30 Panel session 14/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.1

    Description:

    The latest stage in the development of the fishing industry raises the question of whether a new kind of economy should be created, gradually pulling back from a focus on raw products in favour of waste-free, vertically integrated production.

    Participants in this roundtable will discuss cutting-edge global experience in developing and implementing new and promising seafood processing technologies, localizing the production of equipment within Russia, state support measures, workforce opportunities, and markets for the resulting products.

    Structure:

    • Opportunities and challenges in developing coastal seafood processing facilities in the Russian Federation
      • Sales markets: the place and potential of high-value-added Russian products on the domestic and foreign markets
      • Automated or manual labour? Understanding the effectiveness and readiness for use of advanced technological solutions in the seafood processing industry
      • Current state support tools for building coastal seafood processing capacity
    • Seafood processing clusters as a mechanism for increasing economic efficiency in the processing sector
      • The South Kuril cluster – the socioeconomic effect of developing remote, strategically important regions
      • The Kaliningrad cluster – prospects for ‘the Russian Bremerhaven’
    • Innovations in seafood processing
      • Advanced technological solutions in waste-free production
      • Modern design and construction methods

    Outcome: A top ten list of recommendations for creating efficient seafood processing systems.

    Participants:

    1. Vladimir Galitsyn, Deputy Chairman of the Kamchatka Territory Government;
    2. Evgeny Katz, Director, Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture Regulation, Ministry of Agriculture of the Russian Federation Oleg Komarov, General Director, Technological Equipment;
    3. Oleg Komarov, Director General, Technological Equipment LLC;
    4. Alexey Buglak, Executive Director, Pollock Catchers Association;
    5. Konstantin Korobkov, General Director, South Kuril Fishing Plant;
    6. Yevgeny Novoselov, General Director, Okeanrybflot
    7. Vyacheslav Sturzu, Director, NOREYBO-RU.

    Moderator: German Zverev, President, All-Russia Association of Fishery Enterprises, Entrepreneurs and Exporters (VARPE).

    13:30–15:00 Panel session 14/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.2

    Description:

    Many traditional global fishing stocks have been depleted by industry. Meanwhile, the need to increase seafood production remains, fuelled by the growing demand of the Earth’s population. In this context, the majority of analysts believe that a future increase in seafood production volumes can be achieved either by bringing presently unused fisheries into active operation, or by developing aquaculture.

    The share of aquaculture in overall global fish production has seen a gradual increase in recent years. According to FAO data, the share represented by aquaculture, which was 45.5% in 2016, is expected to grow to 52% by 2025. At the same time, a huge imbalance can be seen in the distribution of production, both geographically and nationally. Around 90% of production takes place in Asian countries. Against this backdrop of overall growth, Russia presently produces around 0.2% of global aquaculture output.

    Could Russia find its niche in global aquaculture production? How can the flow of investment into this sector be ensured and associated risks reduced?

    Structure:

    • The status of and trends in global aquaculture development.
    • An overview of key predictions for the aquaculture sector.
    • Advanced technologies in aquaculture; new horizons in fish breeding.
    • Developing aquaculture as part of a larger strategy to develop Russia’s fisheries sector up to 2030: anticipated state support.
    • Management in aquaculture: can failure be turned into success?
    • Vertical integration as a means of increasing value-added and reducing operational and financial risks.
    • Success stories from foreign companies.

    Outcome:

    A list of key risks and a selection of best practices in aquaculture.

    Participants:

    1. Pablo Berazaluce Maturana, Undersecretary of Fisheries and Aquaculture of the Republic of Chile;
    2. Artavazd Hakobyan, Senior Agricultural Economist, World Bank;
    3. Alexander Novikov, President, Union of Russian Sturgeon Farmers;
    4. Yury Kitashin, President, Aquaculture Union;
    5. Vasily Sokolov, Deputy Head, Federal Agency for Fishery;
    6. Masaaki Fukuwaka, Director, National Salmon Resources Center, Hokkaido National Fisheries Research Institute Salmon, Fisheries Research and Development Agency;
    7. Valentin Luntsevich, General Director, Karelprodex;
    8. Anton Voskoboynikov, Director of Aquaculture, SIGRA Group
    9. Alexey Tukavin, First Deputy Governor of the Murmansk Region
    10. Wu Yanqiang, General Director, Dalian Seafood Production Company Banchuidao.

    Moderator: Yekaterina Tribilustova, Specialist for Research and Analysis of International Fishing Industry Markets, Eurofish.

    15:00–16:00 Panel session 14/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.2

    Description:

    Experts believe that climate change and natural phenomena have become key factors of uncertainty for the development of fisheries and aquaculture around the world. A number of aquatic bioresource stocks continue to remain at low levels.

    At the same time, the UN FAO sees opportunities to increase the catch of wild fish, provided that stocks are properly managed. Leading world scientists and environmentalists will present a map of key natural risks and propose solutions for managing them.

    Structure

    • Climate change and natural phenomena are a threat to stability and a key factor of uncertainty for the development of fisheries and aquaculture.
    • Objective assessment of the state of aquatic bioresources on a global scale: risks and opportunities for fishing (general overview).
    • Artificial risks (fishing gear, bycatch, introduction of fish, pollution, GMOs) and how to manage them.
    • Advanced technologies for conserving bioresources and forecasting catches.
    • Successful practices and effective forms of interaction between science and business when analysing the condition of bioresources.
    • Examples of regional (conventional) integration and prospects for the global integration of national stock management systems and fishery forecasting.

    Outcome:

    Decision on the need for closer integration among the scientific community and on holding an annual global conference of industry scientists within the framework of the Global Fishery Forum hosted by Russia.

    Participants:

    1. Vladimir Radchenko, Executive Director, North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission (NPAFC);
    2. Elena Eriksen, Head of Work in Norway, International Council for the Exploration of the Sea Working Group on the Comprehensive Assessment of the Barents Sea, Institute for Marine Research of Norway;
    3. Yevgenia Serova, Director, UN FAO Moscow Office.
    4. Vladimir Kattsov, Director, Voyeykov Main Geophysical Observatory;
    5. Yury Dgebuadze, Director, Aquatic Communities and Invasions Ecology Laboratory, Severtsov Institute of Problems of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPEE RAS);

    Moderator: Kirill Kolonchin, Director, All-Russian Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography

    15:30–17:00 Panel session 14/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.1

    Description:

    According to FAO estimates, the volume of global trade in fish and seafood has increased by about 10% over the past five years. The WTO systematically supports the development of world trade, and bilateral and multilateral trade agreements are in effect. At the same time, many countries take measures to protect national producers and tighten requirements for imported products. Which policy will prevail and what can export-oriented companies expect? These questions will be answered by the roundtable participants: politicians, business leaders, and experts.

    Structure

    • The current state and future of global trade in fish and seafood: a view from the WTO.
    • How effective can free trade agreements be for the fishing industry?
    • Rational barriers: regulators’ views on ensuring the safety of imported products without compromising the development of trade.
    • Positive experience and obstacles encountered by fishery companies in international trade (the experience of Norway, the United States, Russia, Thailand, and Japan).

    Outcome:

    List of key risks and a set of best practices for global trade in fish and seafood.

    Participants:

    1. Nianjun Shen, Fishery Industry Officer, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department; GLOBEFISH Coordinator
    2. Andrew Mallison, Director General, Marine Ingredients Organisation (IFFO)
    3. Pavel Mezhericher, Chief Executive Officer, Loyalty Catalyst
    4. Roy Angelvik, State Secretary (Fisheries Affairs), Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Fisheries of the Kingdom of Norway
    5. Guilherme Blanke, Vice President, Brazilian Fishing Industry Association ABIPESCA;
    6. Alexey Semenov, Managing Director, McDonald’s Russia;
    7. Oystein Valanes, Analyst, Norwegian Seafood Council;
    8. Yekaterina Tribilustova, Specialist for Research and Analysis of International Fishing Industry Markets, Eurofish.
    9. Xu Yaping, Deputy General Secretary, Chinese Union of Seafood Enterprises

    Moderator: Vera Podguzova, Director of External Relations and Communications, Russian Export Center.

    16:30–17:30 14/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.2

    Description:

    Experts believe that climate change and natural phenomena have become key factors of uncertainty for the development of fisheries and aquaculture around the world. A number of aquatic bioresource stocks continue to remain at low levels.

    At the same time, the UN FAO sees opportunities to increase the catch of wild fish, provided that stocks are properly managed. Leading world scientists and environmentalists will present a map of key natural risks and propose solutions for managing them.

    Structure

    • Climate change and natural phenomena are a threat to stability and a key factor of uncertainty for the development of fisheries and aquaculture.
    • Objective assessment of the state of aquatic bioresources on a global scale: risks and opportunities for fishing (general overview).
    • Artificial risks (fishing gear, bycatch, introduction of fish, pollution, GMOs) and how to manage them.
    • Advanced technologies for conserving bioresources and forecasting catches.
    • Successful practices and effective forms of interaction between science and business when analysing the condition of bioresources.
    • Examples of regional (conventional) integration and prospects for the global integration of national stock management systems and fishery forecasting.

    Outcome:

    Decision on the need for closer integration among the scientific community and on holding an annual global conference of industry scientists within the framework of the Global Fishery Forum hosted by Russia.

    Participants:

    1. Abdellah Srour, Executive Secretary, General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean and Black Sea, UN Food and Agriculture Organization;
    2. Nicola Ferri, Fishery Officer (Institutional and Legal Matters), General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean and Black Sea (GFCM), UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO);
    3. Yevgeny Kriksunov, Corresponding Member, Russian Academy of Sciences; Professor, Ichthyology Department, Biological Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University;
    4. Eugene Moon, Executive Secretary, STO Commission;
    5. Massal Fall, Director, Dakar-Tiarua Centre for Oceanographic Research;

    Moderator: Kirill Kolonchin, Director, All-Russian Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography

  • 11:00–13:00 Conference 15/09/2017 Lenexpo Hall 7.1

    Description:

    A new long-term development strategy has been drawn up for the Russian fishing industry. The mission is shifting in favour of a focus on the end user. Large investments are expected along with the transformation of the production structure and improvements in infrastructure. The development of aquaculture will receive a new boost. Marine biotechnologies will play an active role. Overall, the industry is expected to transition from a raw materials model to a model which maximizes value-added by employing modern technologies. How will the global fishing industry meet the changing role of Russia?

    Structure

    • General presentation of the Russian fishing industry’s strategy until 2030.
    • General expert evaluation.
    • Unique opportunities for Russia to attract foreign investment.
    • Assessments of the prospects of key areas (markets) of the global fishing industry (white fish, salmon, mariculture, marine biotechnology (fish food, omega-3 sector)) and the opportunities for Russia to integrate into them.
    • How much vertical integration is essential for international fishing companies?

    Outcome:

    List of recommendations to be included in the strategy as part of a subsequent update.

    Participants:

    1. Arkady Dvorkovich, Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation;
    2. Ilya Shestakov, Deputy Minister of Agriculture of the Russian Federation; Director, Federal Agency for Fishery;
    3. Igor Orlov, Governor of Arkhangelsk Region;
    4. Petra Baader, Managing Owner, BAADER;
    5. German Zverev, President, All-Russia Association of Fishery Enterprises, Entrepreneurs and Exporters (VARPE);
    6. Yevgeny Novoselov, General Director, Okeanrybflot;
    7. Yury Kitashin, President, Aquaculture Union;
    8. Alexander Novikov, President, Union of Russian Sturgeon Farmers;
    9. Konstantin Korobkov, General Director, South Kuril Fishing Plant General Director;
    10. Kirill Kolonchin, Director, All-Russian Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography;
    11. Dmitry Pryakhin, Director, Sales and Marketing Department, United Shipbuilding Corporation;
    12. Vera Podguzova, Director of External Relations and Communications, Russian Export Center.
    13. Alexander Efremov, Director General, “Yuzhmorrybflot”;
    14. Dmitry Ozersky, Chairman of the board, Northwest Fishing Consortium

    Moderator: Vitaly Sheremet, Partner, KPMG Russia.

    14:00–15:00 Panel session 15/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.1

    Description:

    Globally, the pace of construction of new fishing vessels has been minimal in recent decades, although the situation has begun to change in recent years. This is primarily due to the introduction of innovations in the production of commercial, processing, and freezing facilities. Russia also has ambitious plans to build a fleet.

    The roundtable participants will discuss key requirements for modern fishing vessels and form an ‘image of the future’ for vessels that will start being built over the next decade.

    Structure

    • Overview of the state of the fishing fleet on a global scale as compared to the development of related transport sectors.
    • Current trends in the renovation of the fishing fleet (countries, shipyards).
    • Russia as the future centre of fishing fleet construction.
    • Modern trends in marine architecture.
    • Key innovations for fishing, processing, and freezing equipment.
    • Engineering and other effective technologies for the management of vessel construction projects.
    • New ships – new staffing challenges.
    • What is an ‘eco-friendly’ vessel in the modern sense?
    • The global practice of countering surplus fishing fleet capacity.

    Outcome:

    Top 10 recommendations for fishing industry companies that plan to build a fishing fleet..

    Participants:

    1. Robert Focke, Managing Director, BAADER;
    2. Yuri Zadvorny, General Director, Murmanseld 2;
    3. Yury Parshev, Executive Director, F.E.S.T;
    4. Sergey Nesvetov, Arkhangelsk Trawl Fleet;
    5. Andrey Teterkin, General Director, Russian Fish Industrial Company;
    6. Vladimir Maximov, Project Director, Kronstadt Seafood Complex
    7. Vladimir Grigoryev, Chairman of the Board, Union of Fishermen of the North;

    Moderator: Dmitry Pryakhin, Director, Sales and Marketing Department, United Shipbuilding Corporation.

    14:00–15:30 Panel session 15/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.2

    Description:

    Independent environmental certification systems are playing an increasingly important role in the global fisheries industry as a tool for encouraging responsible business practices and a factor in access to consumer markets. Russia is expected to actively develop the certification of key sectors and industries, and is discussing the need to create and develop a national eco-label.

    During the roundtable, representatives of major certification systems and business leaders will discuss the prospects for developing this institution on a global scale and within the context of Russia.

    Structure

    • Modern vision of the mission and objectives of environmental certification.
    • Global perspectives as seen by key players: growth points and constraints.
    • The importance of eco-certification for marketing: the key to promising markets (based on China’s example).
    • What can the consumer expect from an eco-label?
    • The successful practice of certifying large industries and companies as well as constructive criticism from business.
    • The quality of the final product: the need to integrate certification systems with other controls.

    Outcome

    A message from global eco-certification systems to developed and emerging markets.

    Participants:

    1. Camiel Derichs, Regional Director, Europe, Marine Stewardship Council;
    2. Herman Wisse, Programme Director, Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative;
    3. Tatyana Shulezhko, Head, Sustainable Fishery and Certification Project, Longline Fishery;
    4. Alexander Duplyakov, President, Crab Catchers Association of the Far East;
    5. Finnur Gardarsson, Managing Director, Iceland Responsible Fisheries (IRF) Certification Programme;
    6. Andrew Mallison, Director General, International Fishmeal and Fish Oil Organization (IFFO);
    7. Alex Olsen, Vice President for Sustainability Issues, A. Espersen.
    8. Andrey Vinnikov, Head, Sustainable Marine Fisheries Programme, WWF Russia;

    Moderator: Alexey Buglak, Executive Director, Pollock Catchers

    15:30–16:30 15/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.1

    Description:

    Globally, the pace of construction of new fishing vessels has been minimal in recent decades, although the situation has begun to change in recent years. This is primarily due to the introduction of innovations in the production of commercial, processing, and freezing facilities. Russia also has ambitious plans to build a fleet.

    The roundtable participants will discuss key requirements for modern fishing vessels and form an ‘image of the future’ for vessels that will start being built over the next decade.

    Structure

    • Overview of the state of the fishing fleet on a global scale as compared to the development of related transport sectors.
    • Current trends in the renovation of the fishing fleet (countries, shipyards).
    • Russia as the future centre of fishing fleet construction.
    • Modern trends in marine architecture.
    • Key innovations for fishing, processing, and freezing equipment.
    • Engineering and other effective technologies for the management of vessel construction projects.
    • New ships – new staffing challenges.
    • What is an ‘eco-friendly’ vessel in the modern sense?
    • The global practice of countering surplus fishing fleet capacity.

    Outcome:

    Top 10 recommendations for fishing industry companies that plan to build a fishing fleet..

    Participants:

    1. Alfred Tulinius, Nautic;
    2. Ove Wilhelmsen, Wärtsilä Vostok;
    3. Dmitry Firsov, General Director, Wärtsilä Vostok;
    4. Nikolay Shablikov, Deputy Director, Department of Shipbuilding Industry and Marine Equipment, Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation;
    5. Haraldr Ernasson, CEO, Knarr Maritime.
    6. James Findlay, CEO, Australian Fisheries Management Authority
    7. Bjørn Meek, CEO, Bjørdal
    8. Igor Kramarenko, Director General, Giprorrybflot JSC.

    Moderator: Dmitry Pryakhin, Director, Sales and Marketing Department, United Shipbuilding Corporation.

    16:00–17:30 Panel session 15/09/2017 Lenexpo Conference Hall 7.2

    Description

    The UN General Assembly Resolution ‘2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’, which was signed by the Russian Federation, provides for a 50% per capita reduction in global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and a reduction in food losses along production and supply chains by 2030.

    The Sectoral Strategy for the Development of the Fishery Industry of the Russian Federation until 2030 aims to achieve an intensification in processing of raw fish materials by fish market participants and the introduction by fish processing enterprises of modern biotechnological methods that can ensure the cost-effective manufacturing of new products from industrial waste.

    The roundtable participants will consider ways to modernize the fish processing industry, the introduction of new processing technologies to reduce the amount of fish waste, and to prevent unnecessary losses of fish products throughout the distribution chain, including fishing, storage, processing, transportation, and subsequent sale via retail networks.

    Representatives of the fishing industry’s scientific, retail, and business sectors, associations, and experts along with specialists from the UN FAO will discuss the areas where the best results can be achieved in the battle against food losses in Russia (as well as the specific results), what business (producers and retail) can bring to the table, and what the government should do in this regard.

    Structure

    • Introduction to the concept of FLW (food loss and waste associated with product deterioration at all stages of the food chain).
    • An objective assessment, problems, and causes of food loss and waste in the Russian fishing industry and the proposal of a set of priority measures to reduce it. A view of the situation from the FAO and Russian experts.
    • Legislative regulation of relations to help minimize losses of fish and fish products throughout the distribution chain.
    • Management of orders by manufacturers and retail networks; reducing losses associated with over-ordering and over-manufacturing of products.
    • An electronic traceability system for animal products and its role in managing information about the movement of fish and fish products throughout the distribution chain to ensure safety and quality. Development of a uniform labelling standard.
    • Modernization of port and specialized Russian transportation and storage infrastructure as an effective solution for maintaining the high quality of Russian fish products, increasing domestic demand, and enhancing export potential.

    Outcome

    1. Appeal to countries that do not have a plan to combat losses in the food sector with a proposal to set up a structure responsible for working in this area.
    2. Develop methods for determining losses in the food sector, prepare plans to minimize such losses, and prepare a roadmap to consolidate and prioritize various positions.
    3. Hold the International Conference on Combating Losses in the Fishing Industry in Russia in 2018.
    4. Adapt national legislation to minimize the tax costs of companies that sell products with an expiring shelf life.
    5. Recommend that the FAO allocate funding to study this issue with the involvement of industry-based institutions.

    Following the Global Fishery Forum, send the roundtable’s resolution to the parties to the UN Sustainable Development Goals programme within the framework of the procedures established by the FAO

    Participants:

    1. Nicola Ferri, Fishery Officer (Institutional and Legal Matters), General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean and Black Sea (GFCM), UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO);
    2. Evgeny Katz, Director, Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture Regulation, Ministry of Agriculture of the Russian Federation
    3. Roy Angelvik, State Secretary (Fisheries Affairs), Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Fisheries of the Kingdom of Norway;
    4. Seiji Haraguchi, Managing Director, Hokkaido Trawl Fisheries Cooperative Federation
    5. Sergei Gudkov, Executive Director, Fisheries Union
    6. Stanislav Buben, Director of the Agroindustrial Policy, Eurasian Economic Commission
    7. Lyubov Abramova, Advisor to the Director of the All-Russian Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography;
    8. Andrey Gollandtsev, CEO, Slavtran Service;
    9. Vitaly Momot, President, Association of Refrigerated Rolling Stock Operators;
    10. Yury Dubrovin, Chairman of the Board,  Russian Union of Refrigeration Industry, Honorary Mechanical Engineer, Academician of the International Academy of Refrigeration.

    Moderator: Yevgenia Serova, Director, UN FAO Moscow Office.